TWiV 90: Guano happens

July 11, 2010

Hosts: Vincent RacanielloAlan Dove, Rich Condit, and Eric F. Donaldson

Vincent, Alan, Rich and Eric discuss identification of viruses in Northeastern American bats, vaccinia virus infection after sexual contact with a military vaccinee, and identification of a new flavivirus from an Old World bat in Bangladesh.

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Eric – Year of Darwin by Sean Carroll
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Alan –
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Vincent – DengueWatch (thanks Richard!)

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  • ErikCarter

    I just saw an article today in Science Daily on endogenous filovirus genes in bats and…get this…marsupials! It's so odd. Here is the link:

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/10

  • http://www.virology.ws profvrr

    It's on the agenda for the next TWiV…we'll have an expert on
    endogenous viruses to weigh in.

  • Mark Fuccio

    Nice episode, especially learning more about bats' viruses. A great factoid/bar bet: based on genomes bats are closer “relatives” to humans than other rodents/marsupials.

    Here are recent aerial pics of Manhattan reader uncertain about NY geography may appreciate. http://bit.ly/9VlF9R — #24 is a view of Roosevelt Island from the north (Long Island/Queen on left, Manhattan on right), the SmallPox Hospital ruins are at the end of the island.

    I don't understand why, even in the mid 1800's, this was believed to be isolation — maybe due to lack of understanding transmission mechanisms?

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