TWiV 191: When two rights make a wrong

July 15, 2012

infectious laryngotracheitisHosts: Vincent Racaniello, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Nissin Moussatche

Nissin joins the TWiV crew to discuss an outbreak of lethal disease among Cambodian children, and recombination among attenuated herpesvirus vaccines leading to pathogenic viruses.

Click the arrow above to play, or right-click to download TWiV 191 (71 MB .mp3, 99 minutes).

Subscribe to TWiV (free) in iTunes , at the Zune Marketplace, by the RSS feed, by email, or listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app.

Links for this episode:

Weekly Science Picks

Alan – H5N1 genetic changes inventory
Rich – Mythbusters: Diet Coke and Mentos (YouTube channel)
Nissin –
The Pox and the Covenant by Tony Williams, and Tereza Batista, Tired of War by Jorge Amado
Vincent
FAQ: The ‘snake bite’ portion of your thesis defense

Listener Pick of the Week

Gopal - All’s not fair in science and publishing
LuisThe Origin of AIDS by Jacques Pepin (Nature review)
SvenVisualizing information flow in science

Send your virology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twiv@twiv.tv, or call them in to 908-312-0760. You can also post articles that you would like us to discuss at microbeworld.org and tag them with twiv.

  • Pingback: TWiV 191: When two rights make a wrong

  • josh

    I’ve been looking at the genome sequences of Enterovirus-71 (EV-71).  Plenty of them are available on NCBI, most from Chinese outbreaks.  It’s an impressive virus and so many strains are out there, likely makes a vaccine problematic. There is a nice mouse-adapted strain of EV-71 and a few infectious clones reported in the literature.  Vincent, you bring up good points about EV-71, it may be more informative to look at the genomes of the host children.  Finally, just like H5N1 we only hear about the cases that end up in the emergency room.  I hope  the press doesn’t start saying the virus kills 80% of the people it infects :-)

  • Jeff Mahr

    Does anyone have a good reference that gets at the infection control doc’s email concerning the different modes of transmission for different pathogens?  I would love to throw some data for some different pathogens at my allied health micro class for them to interpret… I know its out there but it I am stymied every time I search pubmed for something so broad.